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Section: Prostatitis (list 1)

Acute prostatitis - diagnosis

  Acute prostatitis is relatively easy to diagnose due to its symptoms that suggest infection. The organism may be found in blood or urine, and some times in both. Common bacteria are Escherichia coli, Klebsiella, Proteus, Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Enterococcus, Serratia, and Staphylococcus aureus. This can be a medical emergency in some patients and hospitalization with intravenous antibiotics may be required. A complete blood count reveals increased white blood cells. Sepsis from prostatitis is very rare, but may ...

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Section: Prostatitis

  1. > Chronic bacterial prostatitis - prognosis
  2. > Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome - prevalence
  3. > Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome - signs and symptoms
  4. > Chronic bacterial prostatitis - signs and symptoms
  5. > Acute prostatitis - treatment

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Other articles from the section: Prostatitis

Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome - treatment

  No treatment required. It is standard practice for men with infertility and category IV prostatitis to be given a trial of antibiotics and/or anti-inflammatories however evidence for efficacy are weak. Since signs of asymptomatic prostatic inflammation may sometimes be associated with prostate cancer, this can be addressed by tests that assess the ratio of free-to-total PSA. The results of these tests were significantly different in prostate cancer and category IV prostatitis in one study.    

Section: Prostatitis

Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome - diagnosis

  Diagnosis is through tests of semen, expressed prostatic secretion (EPS) or prostate tissue that reveal inflammation in the absence of symptoms.    

Section: Prostatitis

Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome - signs and symptoms

  Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is characterised by pelvic or perineal pain without evidence of urinary tract infection, lasting longer than 3 months, as the key symptom. Symptoms may wax and wane. Pain can range from mild discomfort to debilitating. Pain may radiate to back and rectum, making sitting difficult. Dysuria, arthralgia, myalgia, unexplained fatigue, abdominal pain, constant burning pain in the penis, and frequency may all be present. ...

Section: Prostatitis

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