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News: December 12, 2009

Researchers Find New Drug To Shrink Breast Cancer Tumors

December 12, 2009

Boston (SmartAboutHealth) - Researchers have discovered a new antibody drug that has the ability to shrink breast cancer tumors that other drugs have failed to impact.
The study was carried out by researcher Dr. Ian Krop and colleagues at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute.
What they discovered is that a hybrid drug, T-DM1, was able to shrink or at least stop the growth of HER2-positive breast cancer tumors.
The drug is a combination of the antibody tratuzumab and the drug DM1, which has the ability to kill breast cancer cells.
The way in which the drug works is pretty remarkable, as it has the ability to cling onto and attack only breast cancer cells, not the healthy cells in the body.
The antibody can work in conjunction with chemotherapy, allowing the chemotherapy to work while not harming the rest of the body.
During the study, they found that the drug was effective in treating 40% of women who have the HER2-positive breast cancers.
The tumors were shrunk by a margin of 30% or more when it was used.
The drug was also found to stabilize the breast cancer tumors at a high rate as well.
The new drug was presented at the 32nd annual CTRC-AACR San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.


Archive issues: (50)

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May 19, 2012 | Senate Passes FDA Safety And Innovation Act

Bill Makes Some Improvements to Medical Device Oversight But Important Patient Safety Protections Still Missing   WASHINGTON, May 24, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Senate approved the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act today. While the legislation includes some improvements over current law, it leaves significant flaws with the FDA's ...

March 10, 2012 | Calcium Supplements May Be Bad for Your Heart

Many older Americans take calcium supplements to prevent bone loss, but they may be significantly increasing their risk for a heart attack, a new study suggests.   These supplements do not help prevent heart attacks or stroke as some previous research has suggested, the study authors say. But dietary calcium might reduce the risk, they noted.   "While a moderately high intake of calcium from diet may go along ...

Archive list: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 [17]

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News

December 20, 2009

Wii, Xbox 360 and Other Video Games Offer Some Benefits

Wii, Xbox 360, PlayStation, and other video games are hot on holiday gift lists, but some parents wonder whether these games offer any benefits or are detrimental to kids. The results of a new study may put some minds at ease, while others may not.  According to the findings reported in the latest issue of Current Directions in Psychological Science, regular gamers transfer ...

December 18, 2009

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Yes, the weather outside is frightful, and soon you will have to think about shoveling snow. But should you be the one doing the work? Who should and should not shovel snow, and how can you do it ...

December 17, 2009

Athletes who take NSAID's to prevent pain may be doing more harm than good

According to Stuart Warden, a researcher who studies musculoskeletal health and sports medicine, athletes who ritualistically take NSAID's to prevent post event and workout soreness and inflammation may be depriving the body of healing, in addition to risking other long term health problems. Taking anti inflammatory medications before running or other ...

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