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News: December 1, 2009

Ecstasy Users at Higher Risk of Sleep Apnea

December 1, 2009

The widely used club drug ecstasy appears to increase the risk of sleep apnea, say U.S. researchers.
"People who use ecstasy need to know that this drug damages the brain and can cause immediate and dangerous problems such as sleep apnea," study author Dr. Una McCann, of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, said in a news release.
McCann and colleagues conducted sleep tests on 71 people who'd used ecstasy (MDMA) and 62 people who'd never used the illegal drug. Ecstasy users had a more than eight-fold increased risk of sleep apnea compared to non-users. Mild sleep apnea rates were similar in both groups (21 percent of ecstasy users and 27 percent of non-users), but only ecstasy users had moderate (13 percent) or severe (1 percent) sleep apnea.
The longer a person used ecstasy, the more sleep apnea episodes they experienced, said the researchers. They also found that ecstasy use was a greater risk factor for sleep apnea than obesity.
"Our findings may be explained by how ecstasy damages neurons related to serotonin, a chemical in the brain that is involved in sleep regulation and breathing, among other important functions," McCann said. "Sleep apnea in itself is dangerous, but it can also contribute to thinking problems in people who use ecstasy because chronic sleep disruption is known to have a negative effect on how a person functions during the daytime."


Archive issues: (50)

Archive list: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 [17]

May 19, 2012 | Senate Passes FDA Safety And Innovation Act

Bill Makes Some Improvements to Medical Device Oversight But Important Patient Safety Protections Still Missing   WASHINGTON, May 24, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Senate approved the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act today. While the legislation includes some improvements over current law, it leaves significant flaws with the FDA's current ...

March 10, 2012 | Calcium Supplements May Be Bad for Your Heart

Many older Americans take calcium supplements to prevent bone loss, but they may be significantly increasing their risk for a heart attack, a new study suggests.   These supplements do not help prevent heart attacks or stroke as some previous research has suggested, the study authors say. But dietary calcium might reduce the risk, they ...

Archive list: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 [17]

Related articles:

Vacuum Therapy

  These work by placing the penis in a vacuum cylinder device. The device helps draw blood into the penis by applying negative pressure. A tension ring is applied at the base of the penis to help maintain the erection. This type of device is sometimes referred to as penis pump and may be used just prior to sexual intercourse. Several types of FDA approved vacuum therapy devices are available with a doctor's prescription.    

Section: Erectile Dysfunction

Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome - treatment

  A 2007 review article by Drs Potts and Payne in the Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine states: "Indeed, chronic abacterial prostatitis (also known as chronic pelvic pain syndrome) is both the most prevalent form and also the least understood and the most challenging to evaluate and treat. This form of prostatitis may respond to non-prostate-centered treatment strategies such as physical therapy, myofascial trigger point release, and relaxation ...

Section: Prostatitis

Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome - signs and symptoms

  These patients have no history of genitourinary pain complaints, but leukocytosis is noted, usually during evaluation for other conditions.    

Section: Prostatitis

News

December 20, 2009

Wii, Xbox 360 and Other Video Games Offer Some Benefits

Wii, Xbox 360, PlayStation, and other video games are hot on holiday gift lists, but some parents wonder whether these games offer any benefits or are detrimental to kids. The results of a new study may put some minds at ease, while others may not.  According to the findings reported in the latest issue of Current ...

December 18, 2009

Should You Be Shoveling Snow?

Yes, the weather outside is frightful, and soon you will have to think about shoveling snow. But should you be the one doing the work? Who should and should not shovel snow, and how can you do it safely?  Every winter, approximately 1,200 Americans die from a heart ...

December 17, 2009

Athletes who take NSAID's to prevent pain may be doing more harm than good

According to Stuart Warden, a researcher who studies musculoskeletal health and sports medicine, athletes who ritualistically take NSAID's to prevent post event and workout soreness and inflammation may be depriving the body of healing, in addition to risking other long term health problems. Taking anti inflammatory medications ...

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