Sections

Alphabetical list:

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P R S T U V W X Y Q Z 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

News: November 22, 2009

FDA To Reduce the Misuse of Medications

November 22, 2009

The FDA wants to reduce the misuse of medications, saying that at least 50,000 hospitalizations a year could be prevented if physicians, pharmacists, patients and parents would be more careful. And the cost of these preventable injuries is estimated at about $4 billion annually by the Institute of Medicine.

FDA commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg stated, "when I first started looking at this, I was stunned at the scope of the problem." She is right there is a huge problem in our country. The Institute of Medicine estimates that at least 1.5 million preventable injuries and deaths result each year from overdosing, mix-ups and unintended exposure to prescription drugs.

Children are often the victims. One study found that, between 2003 and 2006, more than 9,000 children were accidentally exposed to prescription drugs such as codeine and morphine.

This is a problem out of control according to the groundbreaking 2003 medical report Death by Medicine, by Drs. Gary Null, Carolyn Dean, Martin Feldman, Debora Rasio and Dorothy Smith. They claim that 783,900 people in the United States die every year from conventional medicine mistakes.

Commissioner Hamburg said the FDA intends to work with physicians, pharmacists, insurers, and drug companies as well as patients to increase their awareness and form a list of specific problems. She stated that some measures may call for voluntary action on the part of the drug industry and medical community.

"Even if we have a dosing device attached to the bottle, some parents will still reach for the household teaspoon, and we know those teaspoons come in all sizes," said Janet Woodcock, a physician who directs the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research.


"Simply putting out a warning label on a medication does not insure safe and effective use in the real world," Woodcock said. "We can't overlook this and say, 'These guys are not using this right and that's not our problem."

Written by Tyler Woods Ph.D.

Tucson, Arizona

Exclusive to eMaxHealth




Archive issues: (50)

Archive list: 1 [2] 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

December 12, 2009 | Researchers Find New Drug To Shrink Breast Cancer Tumors

Boston (SmartAboutHealth) - Researchers have discovered a new antibody drug that has the ability to shrink breast cancer tumors that other drugs have failed to impact.  The study was carried out by researcher Dr. Ian Krop and colleagues at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute.  What they discovered is that a hybrid drug, T-DM1, was able to shrink or at least stop ...

December 11, 2009 | Fewer dollars for smoking prevention

Even as states pull in billions of dollars in tobacco settlement money - part of which is typically used to fund anti-smoking programs - they're slashing the amount they spend on such programs by 15%.   Altogether, states will spend $567.5 million on anti-smoking efforts in the 2010 fiscal year, ...

December 9, 2009 | Smoking Kills Millions Worldwide Every Year

Tobacco use kills at least 5 million people every year, a figure that could rise if countries don't take stronger measures to combat smoking, the World Health Organization said Wednesday.  In a new report on tobacco use and control, the U.N. agency ...

Archive list: 1 [2] 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

Related articles:

Stoicism and emotional repression

  Society has different rules with regards to the way that men and women are supposed to express themselves. Men are generally regarded as the ones who are supposed to give comfort and strength. If they break down, cry, or seek comfort they may lose face. Women and other men do not give men an option to express feeling sad, tired, weak, depressed, inadequate, needy, or lonely without sacrificing their masculinity.  Men are also four times more likely to commit suicide than women. Often, the family and friends have no idea that something was wrong. Rather ...

Section: Mens health risks

Vacuum Therapy

  These work by placing the penis in a vacuum cylinder device. The device helps draw blood into the penis by applying negative pressure. A tension ring is applied at the base of the penis to help maintain the erection. This type of device is sometimes referred to as penis pump and may be used just prior to sexual intercourse. Several types of FDA approved vacuum therapy devices are available with a doctor's ...

Section: Erectile Dysfunction

Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome - treatment

  A 2007 review article by Drs Potts and Payne in the Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine states: "Indeed, chronic abacterial prostatitis (also known as chronic pelvic pain syndrome) is both the most prevalent form and also the least understood and the most challenging to evaluate and treat. This form of prostatitis may respond to non-prostate-centered treatment strategies ...

Section: Prostatitis

News

December 20, 2009

Wii, Xbox 360 and Other Video Games Offer Some Benefits

Wii, Xbox 360, PlayStation, and other video games are hot on holiday gift lists, but some parents wonder whether these games offer any benefits or are detrimental to kids. The results of a new study may put some minds at ease, while others may not.  According to the findings reported in the latest issue of Current Directions in ...

December 18, 2009

Should You Be Shoveling Snow?

Yes, the weather outside is frightful, and soon you will have to think about shoveling snow. But should you be the one doing the work? Who should and should not shovel snow, and how can you do it ...

December 17, 2009

Athletes who take NSAID's to prevent pain may be doing more harm than good

According to Stuart Warden, a researcher who studies musculoskeletal health and sports medicine, athletes who ritualistically take NSAID's to prevent post event and workout soreness and inflammation may be depriving the ...

Blogroll