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News: November 22, 2009

FDA To Reduce the Misuse of Medications

November 22, 2009

The FDA wants to reduce the misuse of medications, saying that at least 50,000 hospitalizations a year could be prevented if physicians, pharmacists, patients and parents would be more careful. And the cost of these preventable injuries is estimated at about $4 billion annually by the Institute of Medicine.

FDA commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg stated, "when I first started looking at this, I was stunned at the scope of the problem." She is right there is a huge problem in our country. The Institute of Medicine estimates that at least 1.5 million preventable injuries and deaths result each year from overdosing, mix-ups and unintended exposure to prescription drugs.

Children are often the victims. One study found that, between 2003 and 2006, more than 9,000 children were accidentally exposed to prescription drugs such as codeine and morphine.

This is a problem out of control according to the groundbreaking 2003 medical report Death by Medicine, by Drs. Gary Null, Carolyn Dean, Martin Feldman, Debora Rasio and Dorothy Smith. They claim that 783,900 people in the United States die every year from conventional medicine mistakes.

Commissioner Hamburg said the FDA intends to work with physicians, pharmacists, insurers, and drug companies as well as patients to increase their awareness and form a list of specific problems. She stated that some measures may call for voluntary action on the part of the drug industry and medical community.

"Even if we have a dosing device attached to the bottle, some parents will still reach for the household teaspoon, and we know those teaspoons come in all sizes," said Janet Woodcock, a physician who directs the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research.


"Simply putting out a warning label on a medication does not insure safe and effective use in the real world," Woodcock said. "We can't overlook this and say, 'These guys are not using this right and that's not our problem."

Written by Tyler Woods Ph.D.

Tucson, Arizona

Exclusive to eMaxHealth




Archive issues: (50)

Archive list: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 [10] 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

November 17, 2009 | Consumer Reports Finds BPA in Common Canned Foods

In the upcoming December 2009 magazine, Consumer Reports details the testing they have done on dozens of canned food products such as soups, juice, tuna fish and vegetables, for the chemical Bisphenol A, or BPA. The products tested included 19 of the most common brand names such as ...

November 16, 2009 | Steroid Concern Prompts Bodybuilding Supplement Recall

In a press release issued November 3, 2009, Bodybuilding.com LLC, an online supplement retailer, announced that it was conducting a voluntary recall of 65 dietary supplements that were sold through the company's website. The recall is for all lots and expiration dates sold both nationwide and ...

November 15, 2009 | Breastfeeding Benefits Updated by the American Dietetic Association

The health benefits of breastfeeding for both infants and their mothers have been updated and explained in a newly released position paper by the American Dietetic Association (ADA). The ADA strongly encourages breastfeeding whenever possible, noting that it is the "optimal feeding method for the infant."  When one looks at the statistics on breastfeeding in the United States, the figures are ...

Archive list: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 [10] 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

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