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News: November 20, 2009

Yes, Cats Can Catch the Swine Flu

November 20, 2009

Our cut little and cuddly cats that purr at us and give us so much love seems be susceptible to catch the swine flu. In fact, a cat in Iowa has tested positive for the H1N1 virus, state officials confirmed this morning, "marking the first time a cat has been diagnosed with this strain of influenza," the association said in a statement.

"The cat, which has recovered, is believed to have caught the virus from someone in the household who was sick with H1N1. There are no indications that the cat passed the virus on to any other animals or people," the statement said.

This is most peculiar as it is fairly uncommon that flu viruses cross between different species and now H1N1 has been found in pigs, turkeys, a ferret and a cat. Though some viruses can be transmitted from people to their pets it is rare pets give the flu to their owners.

This case of the 13 year-old cat with swine flu is bringing about a reminder to pet owners the American Association of Feline Practitioners that pet owners should monitor their pets' health very closely, no matter what type of animal, and visit a veterinarian if there are any signs of illness.

The American Veterinary Medical Association says that as far as anyone knows and a cat with H1N1 did not infect family members with the virus. It seems it is the other way around. Until more information is available vets are recommending that pets are treated the same way humans are regarding precautions to prevent the flu. This means isolating your pet from sick family members, covering your mouth when you cough, washing your hands and all the rest. And, take your pet to the vet if they appear sick. Basically, take care of yourself and your pets.

Written by Tyler Woods Ph.D.

Tucson, Arizona

Exclusive to eMaxHealth




Archive issues: (50)

Archive list: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 [12] 13 14 15 16 17

November 11, 2009 | Treatment for Sleep Apnea Can Improve Golf Game

Men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who received nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP or NPAP) treatments not only improved their health, but also lowered their golf handicap by as much as three strokes, according to research presented at CHEST 2009, the 75th annual assembly of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP).  Obstructive sleep apnea is a condition in which a person as episodes of stopped breathing during sleep. ...

November 10, 2009 | More Insurance Companies Are Paying For Alternative Medicine

Alternative medicine which was once thought to be controversial and experimental is now gaining newfound respect within the medical community. In fact so much respect that more insurance companies are beginning to pay for alternative medicine.  More and more doctors trained in Western medicine are allowing alternative therapies are beginning to understand the power of alternative ...

November 9, 2009 | Two Antibiotics Linked to Birth Defects

Most antibiotics used during pregnancy are safe, but researchers have found a link between two commonly prescribed drugs and birth defects.  The study, part of the National Birth Defects Prevention Study and published in the November issue of Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, is the first analysis of ...

Archive list: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 [12] 13 14 15 16 17

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News

December 20, 2009

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December 17, 2009

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According to Stuart Warden, a researcher who studies musculoskeletal health and sports medicine, athletes who ritualistically take NSAID's to prevent post event and workout soreness and inflammation may be depriving the body of healing, in addition to risking ...

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