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News: November 19, 2009

Embryonic Stem Cells May Be Used To Create New Skin

November 19, 2009

Boston (SmartAboutHealth) - A new study out of France has revealed that embryonic stem cells may be used to actually create new skin for humans.
The belief is that by using these embryonic stem cells to create new skin, that it could prove extremely helpful in the treatment of burn victims.
Burn victims usually have to wait for skin grafts when they suffer their injuries, but these can take quite some time to develop.
This i sbecause they come from human skin cells and take longer to produce.
While they are waiting for these skin grafts, the thought process now is that the embroynic stem cells could actually create a temporary skin for the victims.
What this means is that it could help in the healing process, helping these burn victims to avoid complications.
The research, as stated, comes out of France and has been published in the November 20th issue of the journal The Lancet.


Archive issues: (50)

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May 19, 2012 | Senate Passes FDA Safety And Innovation Act

Bill Makes Some Improvements to Medical Device Oversight But Important Patient Safety Protections Still Missing   WASHINGTON, May 24, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Senate approved the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act ...

March 10, 2012 | Calcium Supplements May Be Bad for Your Heart

Many older Americans take calcium supplements to prevent bone loss, but they may be significantly increasing their risk for a heart attack, a new study suggests.   These supplements do not help prevent heart attacks or stroke as some previous research has suggested, the study authors say. But dietary calcium might reduce the risk, they noted.   "While a ...

Archive list: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 [17]

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News

December 20, 2009

Wii, Xbox 360 and Other Video Games Offer Some Benefits

Wii, Xbox 360, PlayStation, and other video games are hot on holiday gift lists, but some parents wonder whether these games offer any benefits or are detrimental to kids. The results of a new study may put some minds at ease, while others may not.  According to the findings reported in the latest issue of ...

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December 17, 2009

Athletes who take NSAID's to prevent pain may be doing more harm than good

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