Sections

Alphabetical list:

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P R S T U V W X Y Q Z 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

News: November 18, 2009

Back Pain Linked To Everyday Activites

November 18, 2009

While that occasional back pain may go away after some rest and pain medication, many back pain sufferers are not aware that everyday activities - from wearing high heels to long work hours - can repeatedly strain the spine may lead to more serious consequences later. According to White Plains based neurosurgeon Dr. Jack Stern, M.D., Ph.D., some activities that repeatedly strain the spine may eventually lead to a herniated disc that can require surgery. However, simple lifestyle changes can alleviative the strain and help avoid more serious problems later.

Long work weeks at the computer: Bad posture while slouching over the computer for 12-15 hour days - slouched shoulders, head down, rounded back - places an enormous amount of stress on the spine. Good posture keeps your body in balance and helps avoid that stress. Dr. Stern recommends taking frequent breaks from sitting and exercises that strengthen and stretch the muscles that support the spine to help maintain proper posture.

Tending the garden, raking leaves, shoveling snow, etc: Repetitive twisting, bending, improper lifting, and over-exertion can be very damaging to the back. Dr. Stern recommends that we pay attention to our body mechanics when doing these types of activities, including remembering to bend the knees and lifting heavy objects straight up in one fluid motion without twisting.

Getting to work in high-heels: While most women are aware of the havoc high heels wreck on their feet, many do not think of the consequences on their back and neck. Dr. Stern recommends limiting the time you spend in heels, choosing a lower and wider heel when shoe shopping, and getting the best fit possible by shopping for shoes in the late afternoon or evening.

Recreational sporting: Tag football, 18 holes on the golf course, a Sunday afternoon basketball game - the "weekend warrior" is very likely to cause injury to their back. Dr. Stern recommends fully warming up and stretching before jumping into the game to decrease the likelihood of a sporting injury.

Smoking: Nicotine blocks the transport of oxygen and important nutrients to the spine's discs. Starved of oxygen, the discs are much less able to repair themselves and tend to collapse at a much earlier age than is seen in non-smokers. This painful collapse can lead to chronic back pain. Moreover, should any surgery be needed, smokers have been found to have much slower healing times and a high rate of failure to heal.

Widely acclaimed as one of the world's finest neurosurgeons and a leading authority in his field, Dr. Stern has been named eight-years in a row by New York magazine as one of the area's top doctors. Dr. Stern was also named by The WAG as one of the most distinguished doctors for 2008.

Written by Dr. Jack Stern, M.D., Ph.D.



Archive issues: (50)

Archive list: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 [11] 12 13 14 15 16 17

November 14, 2009 | Helping Children Cope With Stress

As adults we think of childhood as being happy and carefree, however today our world is different. What kinds of stress do children experience? Children in today's world have many concerns. Typical stresses ...

November 13, 2009 | California H1N1 study shows high rates of death over age 50

An examination of H1N1 fatalities in California shows that after hospitalization, most deaths from swine flu occurred in those over age 50. The findings differ from reports that H1N1 flu primarily affects younger people and causes mild illness.  The study, appearing in the November 4 issue of JAMA, revealed that ...

November 12, 2009 | Increase in hot tub injuries raises concern for children

New findings show that over the past two decades, injuries from hot tubs have been increasing. A national study conducted by the Center for Injury Research and Policy of The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital found that hot tub injuries increased from 2,500 to more than 6,600 injuries per ...

Archive list: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 [11] 12 13 14 15 16 17

Related articles:

Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome - signs and symptoms

  These patients have no history of genitourinary pain complaints, but leukocytosis is noted, usually during evaluation for other conditions.    

Section: Prostatitis

Causes

  Drugs (Anti-depressants (SSRIs) and Nicotine are most common. A study entitled "Drug-induced mal sexual dysfunction" concluded that of the 12 most commonly prescribed medications on the market today, 8 of those medications list "impotence" as a side-effect of the drug. Other drugs such as alcohol, cocaine, and heroin negatively impact male sexual libido.)  Neurogenic Disorders (spinal cord and brain injuries, nerve disorders such as Parkinson's disease, ...

Section: Erectile Dysfunction

Treatment - medication (Amitriptyline)

  Amitriptyline can reduce symptoms in patients with IC/PBS. Patient overall satisfaction with the therapeutic result of amitriptyline was excellent or good in 46%.    

Section: Interstitial cystitis

News

December 20, 2009

Wii, Xbox 360 and Other Video Games Offer Some Benefits

Wii, Xbox 360, PlayStation, and other video games are hot on holiday gift lists, but some parents wonder whether these games offer any benefits or are detrimental to kids. The results of a new study may put some minds at ease, while others may not.  According to the findings reported in the latest issue of Current Directions in Psychological Science, regular gamers transfer ...

December 18, 2009

Should You Be Shoveling Snow?

Yes, the weather outside is frightful, and soon you will have to think about shoveling snow. But should you be the one doing the work? Who should and should not shovel snow, and how can you do it safely?  Every winter, approximately 1,200 Americans die from a heart attack or another type of cardiac incident during or after a snowstorm, and shoveling snow is often the ...

December 17, 2009

Athletes who take NSAID's to prevent pain may be doing more harm than good

According to Stuart Warden, a researcher who studies musculoskeletal health and sports medicine, athletes who ritualistically take NSAID's to prevent post event and workout soreness and inflammation may be depriving the body of healing, in addition to risking other long term health problems. Taking anti inflammatory medications before ...

Blogroll