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News: November 7, 2009

Strong Immune Response by Healthy Pregnant Women to H1N1 Vaccine

November 7, 2009

An ongoing clinical trial finds that healthy pregnant women have a strong immune response after receiving just one dose of H1N1 influenza vaccine. The trial, which began on September 9, is sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) of the National Institutes of Health.

Both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and its Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommend that pregnant women receive the inactivated influenza H1Na monovalent vaccine during any stage of pregnancy. This recommendation is based on the fact that pregnant women are at increased risk for severe disease and serious complications, including death, from influenza. Compared with the general population, a greater proportion of pregnant women infected with the H1N1 influenza virus have required hospitalization and have died.

Yet many pregnant women are concerned about receiving the vaccine because of fears about testing. The results of this ongoing trial may put those fears to rest. According to NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, MD, "The immune responses seen in these healthy pregnant women are comparable to those seen in healthy adults at the same time point after a single vaccination, and the vaccine has been well tolerated."

The H1N1 trial enrolled 120 healthy pregnant women, who were randomly assigned to receive either 15-microgram or 30-microgram doses of the H1N1 vaccine three weeks apart. All participants are ages 18 to 39 and entered the study during their second or third trimester of pregnancy. The vaccine does not contain the preservative thimerosal or an immune boosting substance.

Although the trial is ongoing, the results thus far show that in 25 women who received a single 15-microgram dose of the H1N1 influenza vaccine, the vaccine elicited an immune response likely to be protective in 23 (92%) of the women. Among 25 women who received a single 30-microgram dose, the vaccine elicited an immune response likely to be protective in 24 (96%) of the women.

Additional results of the trial will be reported. Thus far, the H1N1 vaccine appears to be well tolerated by healthy pregnant women, and the trial researchers have not encountered any safety issues related to the vaccine.

SOURCE: National Institutes of Health/NIAID



Archive issues: (50)

Archive list: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 [8] 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

November 23, 2009 | Genetic Variant Slows AIDS Progression

Scientists report that a genetic variation appears to play a major role in slowing disease progression in HIV-infected patients.  In fact, those with the variation appear to take years longer to develop AIDS and die of complications of the disease.  "We're honing in on factors that vary across individuals that make a person more or less susceptible to HIV, in terms of ...

November 22, 2009 | FDA To Reduce the Misuse of Medications

The FDA wants to reduce the misuse of medications, saying that at least 50,000 hospitalizations a year could be prevented if physicians, pharmacists, patients and parents would be more careful. And the cost of these preventable injuries is estimated at about $4 billion annually by the Institute of ...

November 21, 2009 | Diabetes Drug Byetta Linked to Kidney Problems

The FDA has received 78 reports of kidney problems related to Byetta, a drug by Amylin Pharmaceuticals and Eli-Lilly prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes. With the new findings, the drug's label will be updated to warn doctors and patients about this possible side effect.  Byetta ...

Archive list: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 [8] 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

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