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News: November 7, 2009

Strong Immune Response by Healthy Pregnant Women to H1N1 Vaccine

November 7, 2009

An ongoing clinical trial finds that healthy pregnant women have a strong immune response after receiving just one dose of H1N1 influenza vaccine. The trial, which began on September 9, is sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) of the National Institutes of Health.

Both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and its Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommend that pregnant women receive the inactivated influenza H1Na monovalent vaccine during any stage of pregnancy. This recommendation is based on the fact that pregnant women are at increased risk for severe disease and serious complications, including death, from influenza. Compared with the general population, a greater proportion of pregnant women infected with the H1N1 influenza virus have required hospitalization and have died.

Yet many pregnant women are concerned about receiving the vaccine because of fears about testing. The results of this ongoing trial may put those fears to rest. According to NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, MD, "The immune responses seen in these healthy pregnant women are comparable to those seen in healthy adults at the same time point after a single vaccination, and the vaccine has been well tolerated."

The H1N1 trial enrolled 120 healthy pregnant women, who were randomly assigned to receive either 15-microgram or 30-microgram doses of the H1N1 vaccine three weeks apart. All participants are ages 18 to 39 and entered the study during their second or third trimester of pregnancy. The vaccine does not contain the preservative thimerosal or an immune boosting substance.

Although the trial is ongoing, the results thus far show that in 25 women who received a single 15-microgram dose of the H1N1 influenza vaccine, the vaccine elicited an immune response likely to be protective in 23 (92%) of the women. Among 25 women who received a single 30-microgram dose, the vaccine elicited an immune response likely to be protective in 24 (96%) of the women.

Additional results of the trial will be reported. Thus far, the H1N1 vaccine appears to be well tolerated by healthy pregnant women, and the trial researchers have not encountered any safety issues related to the vaccine.

SOURCE: National Institutes of Health/NIAID



Archive issues: (50)

Archive list: 1 2 3 4 [5] 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

December 2, 2009 | Fatty acids in diet affect ulcerative colitis risk

People who eat lots of red meat, cook with certain types of oil, and use some kinds of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-heavy margarines may be increasing their risk of a painful inflammatory bowel disease, a study in more than 200,000 Europeans shows.  These foods are high in linoleic acid and the study have found that people who were the heaviest consumers of this omega-6 PUFA were more than twice as likely to develop ulcerative colitis as those who consumed the ...

December 1, 2009 | Ecstasy Users at Higher Risk of Sleep Apnea

The widely used club drug ecstasy appears to increase the risk of sleep apnea, say U.S. researchers.  "People who use ecstasy need to know that this drug damages the brain and can cause immediate and dangerous problems such as sleep apnea," study author Dr. Una McCann, of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, said in a news release.  McCann and colleagues conducted sleep tests ...

November 30, 2009 | Switching to Light Cigarettes Will Not help you Quit Smoking

The Center of Disease Control (CDC) says that there are 44 million American smokers and many of these smokers are looking for ways to quit. Some smokers in an attempt to kick the habit are switching to "light" or "ultra light" to help their battle against nicotine, however, a new study suggests switching to a lighter cigarerette ...

Archive list: 1 2 3 4 [5] 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

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December 20, 2009

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