Sections

Alphabetical list:

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P R S T U V W X Y Q Z 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

News: November 5, 2009

To Quit Smoking, Use Patch Plus Lozenge

November 5, 2009

Out of five different smoking cessation methods, the nicotine patch plus lozenges proved to be the most effective, according to research published in the November issue of Archives of General Psychiatry. The study is the first to compare the different products against each other.

Megan E. Piper, PhD and colleagues at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health found this combination to be the only modality with significantly higher abstinence from smoking compared with a placebo.

The researchers studied over 1500 adults over a period of six months who smoked at least 10 cigarettes a day. The patients were disqualified if they used any form of tobacco other than cigarettes, were currently taking the prescription medication buproprion, or had a mental health diagnosis of either psychosis or schizophrenia. All participants stated a motivation to quit smoking.

Bupropion is the generic name of the medication used as a smoking cessation drug (brand name Zyban) and as an antidepressant (Wellbutrin).

The participants were randomized to one of five treatment scenarios - nicotine lozenge alone, nicotine patch alone, sustained release buproprion alone or one of two combination therapies, buproprion plus lozenge or patch plus lozenge. The remainder of the study group received a placebo. All participants also received six individual smoking cessation counseling sessions with a case manager.

Smoking rates were assessed at one week, eight weeks, and six months after the beginning of the study.

All of the smoking cessation treatments worked better than the placebo for initial cessation and during the first week after quitting, but the therapy that provided the highest abstinence rate after six months was the patch plus lozenge combination, with a 40% success rate. The reasoning behind the successful combination is that the patch supplies a steady supply of nicotine replacement while the lozenge quells additional cravings.

In addition to initial cessation, participants who combined the patch and the lozenge were better able to remain smoke-free longer before having a cigarette or relapsing into regular smoking.

There were adverse events noted in each modality that was consistent with results from previous research: skin irritation associated with patch use, sleep disturbances and abnormal dreams for those on bupropion, and nausea for those on lozenges. Patients in the combination therapies reported more of the complications than those on single therapies or placebo. Four participants withdrew from the study, but there was only one serious event, hospitalization for seizures, which was possibly related to study medication, the researchers said.

The findings of this study complement the recommendation of the 2008 Update to the Public Health Service Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence Clinical Practice Guideline, which says that using the nicotine patch along with nicotine gum or spray is the most effective methods to quit smoking.



Archive issues: (50)

Archive list: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 [15] 16 17

November 2, 2009 | Ground Beef Recall, Meat Sold in 8 States

Consumers are warned that a new beef recall is in effect. Fairbank Farms issued a voluntary beef recall on Saturday, October 31, specifically for its line of fresh ground beef products sold in eight states. Thus far one person, a New Hampshire resident, has reportedly died after consuming the recalled beef, which is believed to be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7. ...

Can Chewing Gum Really Help You Lose Weight? | November 1, 2009

Chewing sugar-free gum may help you lose weight, according to a nutrition professor at the University of Rhode Island. The new study notes that chewing gum can help to reduce the number of calories you eat and increase your energy ...

October 10, 2009 | Who Is To Blame For The Swine Flu Vaccine Problems?

Washington (SmartAboutHealth) - One thing has become perfectly clear over the past few weeks, there is a major problem in the U.S. in regards to getting the H1N1 swine flu vaccine out to the public, but who is to blame?  The swine flu continues to run rampant all across the U.S. and the delivery of the H1N1 swine flu vaccine is failing to ...

Archive list: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 [15] 16 17

Related articles:

Acute prostatitis - diagnosis

  Acute prostatitis is relatively easy to diagnose due to its symptoms that suggest infection. The organism may be found in blood or urine, and some times in both. Common bacteria are Escherichia coli, Klebsiella, Proteus, Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Enterococcus, Serratia, and Staphylococcus aureus. This can be a medical emergency in some patients and hospitalization with intravenous antibiotics may be required. A complete blood count reveals increased white blood cells. Sepsis from prostatitis is very rare, but may occur in immunocompromised patients; high ...

Section: Prostatitis

About mens health risks

  Mortality rates for all of the 15 leading causes of death for the total population are higher for males than females in America. Men die almost seven years earlier than women. Men are more likely to suffer from chronic illnesses, to suffer a traumatic brain injury, and to die from ...

Section: Mens health risks

Treatment - medication (bladder instillations)

  DMSO, a wood pulp extract, is the only approved bladder instillation for IC/PBS yet it is much less frequently used in urology clinics. Research studies presented at recent conferences of the American Urological Association by C. Subah Packer have demonstrated that the FDA approved dosage of a 50% solution of DMSO had the potential of creating irreversible muscle contraction. However, a lesser solution of 25% was found to be reversible. Long term use is questionable, at best, particularly given the fact that the method of action of ...

Section: Interstitial cystitis

News

December 20, 2009

Wii, Xbox 360 and Other Video Games Offer Some Benefits

Wii, Xbox 360, PlayStation, and other video games are hot on holiday gift lists, but some parents wonder whether these games offer any benefits or are detrimental to kids. The results of a new study may put some minds at ease, while others may ...

December 18, 2009

Should You Be Shoveling Snow?

Yes, the weather outside is frightful, and soon you will have to think about shoveling snow. But should you be the one doing the work? Who should and should not shovel snow, and how can you do it ...

December 17, 2009

Athletes who take NSAID's to prevent pain may be doing more harm than good

According to Stuart Warden, a researcher who studies musculoskeletal health and sports medicine, athletes who ritualistically take NSAID's to prevent post event and workout soreness and inflammation may be depriving the body of healing, in addition to risking other long term health problems. Taking anti inflammatory medications before running or other athletic events, is not ...

Blogroll