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News: November 2, 2009

Ground Beef Recall, Meat Sold in 8 States

November 2, 2009

Consumers are warned that a new beef recall is in effect. Fairbank Farms issued a voluntary beef recall on Saturday, October 31, specifically for its line of fresh ground beef products sold in eight states. Thus far one person, a New Hampshire resident, has reportedly died after consuming the recalled beef, which is believed to be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7. Two other individuals reportedly have fallen ill as well.

More than 270 tons of ground beef was recalled by the New York manufacturer, which stated in its news release that the products were sold in Connecticut, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. The individual who reportedly died after eating the tainted beef was from a neighboring state.

The recalled beef was produced between September 14 and September 16, 2009. Consumers should check packages of ground beef from Fairbank Farms and look for the product name, package weight, and sell-by date (ranging from 09/19/09 through 09/28/09), as well as an establishment number of EST 492 inside the USDA mark of inspection.

The recalled ground beef was distributed to Acme, BJ's Wholesale Club/Burris, Ford Brothers, Giant Food, Price Chopper, Shaw's Supermarkets, and Trader Joe's. Cases of 10-pound fresh ground beef chubs were distributed to retail establishments in Maryland, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Virginia for additional processing.

Consumers can return the recalled beef products to the point of purchase for a full refund. Fairbank Farms has established a toll-free hotline (877-546-0122) to answer consumers' questions. Information is also available on the company's website (www.fairbankfarms.com). Consumers who experience any ill symptoms after consuming ground beef products (e.g., bloody diarrhea, abdominal pain, dehydration) should seek medical assistance immediately. E. coli O157:H7 is a Shiga toxin, which is one of the most potent poisons known to man.

This latest ground beef recall follows closely after another on October 27, 2009, by South Shore Meats of Brockton, Massachusetts, after several children became ill with diarrhea after eating beef at a camp. Two children tested positive for E. coli O157:H7 and two were hospitalized. As of October 29, the Rhode Island Department of Health and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health had identified more than 20 cases of diarrheal illness. Several other illnesses were also linked to retail purchases of the beef. The South Shore Meats beef recall was for 1,039 pounds of meat.



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November 17, 2009 | Consumer Reports Finds BPA in Common Canned Foods

In the upcoming December 2009 magazine, Consumer Reports details the testing they have done on dozens of canned food products such as soups, juice, tuna fish and vegetables, for the chemical Bisphenol A, or BPA. The products tested included 19 of the most common brand names such as Campbell's, Chef Boyardee, Del Monte, Nestle, and Progresso.  BPA is a plastic hardener and a component of ...

November 16, 2009 | Steroid Concern Prompts Bodybuilding Supplement Recall

In a press release issued November 3, 2009, Bodybuilding.com LLC, an online supplement retailer, announced that it was conducting a voluntary recall of 65 dietary supplements that were sold through the company's website. The recall is for all lots and expiration dates sold both nationwide and internationally.  The FDA states they have conducted a two-year investigation in which products bought from bodybuilding.com were later tested positive for steroids. Unlike foods ...

November 15, 2009 | Breastfeeding Benefits Updated by the American Dietetic Association

The health benefits of breastfeeding for both infants and their mothers have been updated and explained in a newly released position paper by the American Dietetic Association (ADA). The ADA strongly encourages breastfeeding whenever possible, noting that it is the "optimal feeding method for the infant."  When one looks at the statistics on breastfeeding in the United States, the figures are disappointing. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention statistics for ...

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