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News: Can Chewing Gum Really Help You Lose Weight?

November 1, 2009

Can Chewing Gum Really Help You Lose Weight?

Chewing sugar-free gum may help you lose weight, according to a nutrition professor at the University of Rhode Island. The new study notes that chewing gum can help to reduce the number of calories you eat and increase your energy output.

According to the US Mint Industry, half of all Americans chew gum, and the average American chews about 300 sticks, or about 1.5 pounds of gum per year. Many people chew gum to help them resist eating, when they are trying to stop smoking, and when they are tense. The average person burns about 11 calories per hour when chewing gum.

In the University of Rhode Island study, Kathleen Melanson, associate professor of nutrition and food sciences, compared gum chewing to non-gum chewing in 35 adults. The subjects participated in two lab sessions in random order after fasting overnight. During one session, the subjects chewed gum for 20 minutes before they consumed a breakfast shake, then chewed gum two more times for 20 minutes each during the three hours before lunch.

During each visit, the researcher measured the resting metabolism rates and blood glucose levels of the subjects before and after breakfast and lunch. The participants also conducted self-assessments of their feelings of hunger, energy level, and other factors. Melanson reported that individuals who chewed gum before and after eating burned about 5 percent more energy than when they did not chew gum. The participants also said they felt more energetic after chewing gum.

The test results also showed that subjects who chewed gum for a total of one hour before lunch consumed 67 fewer calories at lunch than the subjects who did not chew gum. The gum chewers also did not make up for the fewer calories at lunch by eating more later in the day. One possible reason chewing gum might help with weight loss is that when people chew, the nerves in the muscles of the jaw are stimulated and send signals to the appetite area of the brain that is associated with satiety. Thus chewing gum might help to reduce feelings of hunger.

The results of this study suggest that chewing gum may help as part of a weight loss or management program. Additional studies will investigate gum chewing in people who need to lose weight.


Archive issues: (50)

Archive list: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 [11] 12 13 14 15 16 17

November 14, 2009 | Helping Children Cope With Stress

As adults we think of childhood as being happy and carefree, however today our world is different. What kinds of stress do children experience? Children in today's world have many concerns. Typical stresses would include school work and socialization however, the stress doesn't stop there for today's modern children.  Many stressors today come from financial burdens with the recession. Many ...

November 13, 2009 | California H1N1 study shows high rates of death over age 50

An examination of H1N1 fatalities in California shows that after hospitalization, most deaths from swine flu occurred in those over age 50. The findings differ from reports that H1N1 flu primarily affects younger people and causes mild illness.  The study, appearing in the November 4 issue of JAMA, revealed that thirty percent of H1N1 flu cases have required admission to intensive care ...

November 12, 2009 | Increase in hot tub injuries raises concern for children

New findings show that over the past two decades, injuries from hot tubs have been increasing. A national study conducted by the Center for Injury Research and Policy of The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital found that hot tub injuries increased from 2,500 to more than 6,600 injuries per year between 1990 and 2007. Most injuries occur in those over age sixteen, but children are especially at risk for ...

Archive list: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 [11] 12 13 14 15 16 17

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Wii, Xbox 360, PlayStation, and other video games are hot on holiday gift lists, but some parents wonder whether these games offer any benefits or are detrimental to kids. The results of a new study may put some minds at ease, while others may not.  According to the findings reported in the latest issue of Current Directions in ...

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According to Stuart Warden, a researcher who studies musculoskeletal health and sports medicine, athletes who ritualistically take NSAID's to prevent post event and workout soreness and inflammation may be depriving the body of healing, in addition to risking other long term health problems. Taking anti ...

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