Sections

Alphabetical list:

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P R S T U V W X Y Q Z 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

News: Can Chewing Gum Really Help You Lose Weight?

November 1, 2009

Can Chewing Gum Really Help You Lose Weight?

Chewing sugar-free gum may help you lose weight, according to a nutrition professor at the University of Rhode Island. The new study notes that chewing gum can help to reduce the number of calories you eat and increase your energy output.

According to the US Mint Industry, half of all Americans chew gum, and the average American chews about 300 sticks, or about 1.5 pounds of gum per year. Many people chew gum to help them resist eating, when they are trying to stop smoking, and when they are tense. The average person burns about 11 calories per hour when chewing gum.

In the University of Rhode Island study, Kathleen Melanson, associate professor of nutrition and food sciences, compared gum chewing to non-gum chewing in 35 adults. The subjects participated in two lab sessions in random order after fasting overnight. During one session, the subjects chewed gum for 20 minutes before they consumed a breakfast shake, then chewed gum two more times for 20 minutes each during the three hours before lunch.

During each visit, the researcher measured the resting metabolism rates and blood glucose levels of the subjects before and after breakfast and lunch. The participants also conducted self-assessments of their feelings of hunger, energy level, and other factors. Melanson reported that individuals who chewed gum before and after eating burned about 5 percent more energy than when they did not chew gum. The participants also said they felt more energetic after chewing gum.

The test results also showed that subjects who chewed gum for a total of one hour before lunch consumed 67 fewer calories at lunch than the subjects who did not chew gum. The gum chewers also did not make up for the fewer calories at lunch by eating more later in the day. One possible reason chewing gum might help with weight loss is that when people chew, the nerves in the muscles of the jaw are stimulated and send signals to the appetite area of the brain that is associated with satiety. Thus chewing gum might help to reduce feelings of hunger.

The results of this study suggest that chewing gum may help as part of a weight loss or management program. Additional studies will investigate gum chewing in people who need to lose weight.


Archive issues: (50)

Archive list: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 [10] 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

November 17, 2009 | Consumer Reports Finds BPA in Common Canned Foods

In the upcoming December 2009 magazine, Consumer Reports details the testing they have done on dozens of canned food products such as soups, juice, tuna fish and vegetables, for the chemical Bisphenol A, or BPA. The products tested included 19 of the ...

November 16, 2009 | Steroid Concern Prompts Bodybuilding Supplement Recall

In a press release issued November 3, 2009, Bodybuilding.com LLC, an online supplement retailer, announced that it was conducting a voluntary recall of 65 dietary supplements that were sold through the company's website. The recall is for all lots and expiration ...

November 15, 2009 | Breastfeeding Benefits Updated by the American Dietetic Association

The health benefits of breastfeeding for both infants and their mothers have been updated and explained in a newly released position paper by the American Dietetic Association (ADA). The ADA strongly encourages breastfeeding whenever possible, noting that it is the "optimal feeding method for the infant."  When one looks at the statistics on breastfeeding in the United States, the figures are disappointing. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ...

Archive list: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 [10] 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

Related articles:

Causes

  The cause of IC/PBS is unknown, though several theories have been put forward (these include autoimmune, neurologic, allergic and genetic). Regardless of the origin, it is clear that the majority of IC/PBS patients struggle with a damaged urothelium, or bladder lining. When the surface glycosaminoglycan (GAG) layer is damaged (via a urinary tract infection (UTI), excessive consumption of coffee or sodas, traumatic injury, etc.), urinary chemicals ...

Section: Interstitial cystitis

Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome - nomenclature

  The name of this disorder is evolving. In 2007, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) began using the umbrella term Urologic Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndromes (UCPPS), for research purposes, to refer to pain syndromes associated with the bladder (i.e. interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome, IC/PBS) and the prostate gland (i.e. chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, CP/CPPS).    

Section: Prostatitis

About interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome

  Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (commonly abbreviated to "IC/PBS"), is a urinary bladder disease of unknown cause characterised by pain associated with urination (dysuria), urinary frequency (as often as every 10 minutes), urgency, and pressure in the bladder and/or pelvis. Pain that worsened with a certain food or drink and/or worsened with bladder filling and/or improved with urination was reported by 97% of patients. ...

Section: Interstitial cystitis

News

December 20, 2009

Wii, Xbox 360 and Other Video Games Offer Some Benefits

Wii, Xbox 360, PlayStation, and other video games are hot on holiday gift lists, but some parents wonder whether these games offer any benefits or are detrimental to kids. The results of a new study may ...

December 18, 2009

Should You Be Shoveling Snow?

Yes, the weather outside is frightful, and soon you will have to think about shoveling snow. But should you be the one doing the work? Who should and should not shovel snow, and how can you do it safely?  Every winter, approximately 1,200 Americans die from a heart attack or another type of ...

December 17, 2009

Athletes who take NSAID's to prevent pain may be doing more harm than good

According to Stuart Warden, a researcher who studies musculoskeletal health and sports medicine, athletes who ritualistically take NSAID's to prevent post event and workout soreness and inflammation may be depriving the body of healing, in addition to risking other long term health problems. Taking anti inflammatory medications before running or other athletic ...

Blogroll